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Articles

Toivanen Hannes and Suominen Arho’s new publication

Open Access: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0122098

Abstract

Applying distance-to-frontier analysis, we have used 2.9 million patents and population data to assess whether the relative capacity of world countries and major regions to create new knowledge and technology has become globally more equal or less equal between 1990 and 2010. We show with the Gini coefficient that the global distribution of inventors has become more equal between major countries and regions. However, this trend has been largely due to the improved performance of only two major countries, China and India. The worst performing regions, totalling a population of almost 2 billion, are actually falling behind. Our results suggest that substantial parts of the global population have fallen further behind countries at the global frontier in their ability to create new knowledge and inventions, and that the catch-up among the least developed and middle-income countries is highly uneven, prompting questions about the nature and future of the global knowledge economy.

High-lights
· Applying distance-to-frontier analysis, we have used 2.9 million patents and population data to assess whether the relative capacity of world countries and major regions to create new knowledge and technology has become globally more equal or less equal between 1990 and 2010;
· While our results confirm that there is indeed increased equality in the global inventive effort when measured on the level of countries and major regions, this perceived improvement itself is highly concentrated phenomenon.
· Substantial parts of the global population have fallen further behind countries at the global frontier in their ability to create new knowledge and inventions;
· Catch-up among the least developed and middle-income countries is highly uneven;
· The distance of South Africa and Other South America to the global frontier increases the most of all countries and regions in the data:
· The relative position of Brazil, Mexico, and Argentina remains practically unchanged.

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Michael Ter-Berg’s article at EUBusiness.com summing up the presentation of the report on Technology Driven Foreign Direct Investment (TFDI) in the EU from emerging economies:

http://www.eubusiness.com/topics/finance/tdfdi-lund

The recent issue of Columbia FDI Perspectives addresses Chinese foreign direct investment in Europe. It focuses on the major challenges that Chinese investors have faced in that host environment.

The Perspective may be accessed by following the link.

Columbia FDI Perspectives is an occasional series of perspectives on important and topical foreign direct investment issues.

“A Dynamic Comparative Analysis of International Innovation Networks in Emerging Market MNCs”

by Yuandi Wang, Dylan Sutherland & Lutao Ning

Check it out at:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13662716.2014.983749#.VIHLQckhCF9

 

One of our article (Plechero and Chaminade, 2013)  has been included in an online article collection on International Business and Management within Africa, The Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and Oceania. All articles are freely available until the end of 2014 via the collection homepage: http://bit.ly/1wLgg77

386

Gouya Harirchi

Cristina Chaminade

Abstract

User–producer interactions have been recognized as important for innovation. With the rapid growth of emerging economies’ markets, and an increasing degree of technological sophistication of both users and producers in those markets, user–producer interaction is becoming global. Using original firm-level data, this paper explores how collaboration with users in different income regions affects the degree of innovations’ novelty. We find that collaborating with international users is positively related to higher degrees of novelty. Furthermore, firms in low- and middle income countries will benefit more from south–south user collaboration than a south–north one.

Download here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305750X13002647

Feng Zhang

John A. Cantwell

Abstract

This study focuses on the innovative performance implications of large MNCs’ regional and global technological knowledge search strategies. In networked MNCs, the parent can still offer valuable knowledge to subsidiaries. The parent’s and a subsidiary’s knowledge becomes complementary if an MNC appropriately adopts a global strategy at the parent level and a regional strategy at the subsidiary level. An analysis of the world’s largest firms in the Electrical Equipment industry shows that, in general, a global strategy improves the innovative performance of the MNC. Meanwhile, only the combination of a global strategy at the parent level and a regional strategy at the subsidiary level is positively associated with the innovative performance of the MNC. This study contributes to the literature on networked MNCs and the debate of globalization and regionalization. Managerial implications are discussed as well.

Download here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13662716.2013.850809#.Uox4_8Sko2E

Ping Lv

Monica Plechero

Rakesh Basant

Abstract

This study investigates the types of international competitive strategies (ICS) followed by Chinese and Indian firms. Using firm-level primary data, the contribution analyses the factors that affect ICS choices and whether these factors differ between the two countries. It argues that firms’ resources and capabilities influence firms’ propensity to choose a specific ICS and that the strategies differ in relation to firms’ location, sector and destination market as well.

Download here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13602381.2013.815442#.Uox598Sko2E

Monica Plechero

Cristina Chaminade

Abstract:

Since the seminal work of Archibugi and Michie (1995) on the globalization of innovation, several authors have attempted to understand the complex relationship between innovation and internationalization. However, most tend to focus on industrialized countries, just one mode of globalization of innovation and often one traditional indicator of innovation, such as patents or R&D investment, thus ignoring the complexity and multiple aspects of the phenomenon. This paper explores empirically the linkages between different modes of globalization of innovation and firms’ micro-characteristics in two of the fastest growing emerging economies. We analyze three distinct modes of globalization of innovation: the global exploitation of innovation, the global sourcing of technology and global research collaboration. We then use primary data from Chinese and Indian firms belonging to three sectors (automotive components, software and green biotech) to explore the differences in the ways in which the firms located in these two economies globalize their innovation activities.

Download here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13662716.2013.849457#.Uox3osSko2E

John Gaffney

Janani Sarvanantham

A number of influential international organizations recently have issued publications that discuss the promotion of sustainable development in international investment. These organizations include the United Nations, UNCTAD, FAO, IFAD, the UNCTAD Secretariat, and the World Bank Group, the Commonwealth Secretariat, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), and the South African Development Community (SADC).

These publications evince two theoretically distinct, but complementary, approaches to the promotion of sustainable development in international investment:

read more here http://www.vcc.columbia.edu/content/achieving-sustainable-development-objectives-international-investment-could-future-iias-impo

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